EXPECT SOMETHING DIFFERENT at 180 events across the country

Who doesn’t love a festival…and who doesn’t love it even more when it’s free? To keep the buzz around the Women’s World Cup going, this summer sees the staging of the Women’s Soft Ball Cricket Festival with 180 events across the country. Soft Ball, say what ball?….

Don’t know the game? Couldn’t be easier. Soft ball, everyone gets to bat, bowl and field, simple scoring, no dress code. Games last no more than 60 minutes, the festival a couple of hours. Basically: maximum fun, minimum yawn – that’s soft ball cricket. The perfect game for women of all ages, and a brilliant intro to cricket.

Like any good festival, wherever you are you’ll find a relaxed, warm welcome, loos, parking, food and drink and everything else to make the day go with a swing. So find your free festival, enjoy something new, and share the good times with friends and family.

WANT TO KNOW MORE
Here’s a bite-sized guide to help you get to know more about the cricket in Women’s Soft Ball Cricket Festival and get the most from your day.

My team
Teams consist of six to eight people and every player will have the chance to bat, bowl and field. When batting you should be divided into pairs so you and a team-mate will bat together, one at each end of the wicket. Each pair will face two or three overs, with six balls in an over. Your team will bat once during the game. In the field, your festival organiser will encourage each player in your team to bowl at least one over (with a maximum of three) per innings. You can choose to bowl overarm or underarm depending on your experience and preference.

How do I score runs?

Each batting team starts with a score of 200 runs. You and your team-mates score runs by running between the wickets (stumps) or by hitting the ball to the boundary. Boundary scoring is four if the ball hits the ground before going across the boundary; six if the ball is hit over the boundary without hitting the ground. Even if you miss the ball or it hits your body, you can still run and score. If you are out, five runs are deducted from the score and your batting partner faces the next ball – except if you are run out, in which case you will not need to change ends. Two runs will be awarded to your team for each wide (a ball bowled to you wide of the wicket that you aren’t able to reach). Your team will also get two runs for a no-ball with the ball bouncing more than twice before reaching the batter or arriving at shoulder height, or above, without bouncing.

Can I be dismissed when batting?

When you’re batting, you could be out (dismissed) in the following ways:
• Bowled (the ball hits the stumps)
• Caught (a fielder catches the ball in the air off your bat)
• Run out (a fielder hit the stumps before the running batters can reach them)
• Stumped (the wicketkeeper hits the stumps with the ball when you are not behind your line or crease)
• Hit wicket (you hit the stumps with your bat or body)
You cannot be out leg before wicket (lbw), unless you deliberately block the ball with a leg or foot.

How long will we play for?

Each game should last no longer than an hour and the team with the highest score wins. If your team scores the same number of runs as your opposition, the game is tied.

Do I need specific kit or equipment?

There is no dress code to take part, all we recommend is that you wear comfortable clothes and shoes. You will also receive your own Women’s Soft Ball Cricket Festival t-shirt. All playing equipment is also provided as well as a great atmosphere, of course.

Find your free festival at https://www.ecb.co.uk/play/women-and-girls/womens-softball-cricket-festivals

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ECB

The England and Wales Cricket Board was established on January 1, 1997 as the single national governing body for all cricket in England and Wales. It has its headquarters at Lord’s Cricket Ground in London.


The formation of the ECB was the culmination of a drive towards creating, for the first time, one unified body responsible for the management and development of every form of cricket for men and women. This included clubs, schools, juniors and youth, disabilities cricket, representative, first class and international cricket – the whole game from playground to the Test arena.


The ECB took over the responsibilities carried out for some 30 years by the Test and County Cricket Board (TCCB), the National Cricket Association (NCA) and the Cricket Council, all of which ceased to exist. In April 1998 the Women’s Cricket Association (WCA) was also integrated into the organisation. The formation of the ECB followed two years of research into how cricket in England and Wales could be better organised to attract more players to the game, raise standards at all levels and promote cricket as a spectator sport.


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